Resource specialist takes unique approach to tutoring, studies student learning styles

Katy Hallowell | the broadview.  Juniors Taylor Carlson and Solana Boboschi sit in Kievlan's office and discuss grades they recieved on an english paper. Kievlan tutors students in all subjects, and helps them to build effective study habits.

Katy Hallowell | the broadview. Juniors Taylor Carlson and Solana Boboschi sit in Kievlan's office and discuss grades they recieved on an english paper. Kievlan tutors students in all subjects, and helps them to build effective study habits.


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A glance into the learning resource specialist’s office across from the freshman-sophomore locker room reveals a smiling face resting on propped elbows, greeting students who walk by with a “Hey, come on in!”
Patricia Kievlan, who began working at CSH in the fall, decided to pursue a career in education after graduating from the University of Texas.
“I originally thought that I wanted to earn a PhD in English.” Kievlan said. “Luckily, I realized that I was less interested in studying Virginia Woolf for the rest of my life and more interested in helping people. That’s why I chose to earn my master’s degree from the Mind, Brain, and Education program at the Harvard Graduate School of Education.”
The program studies the intersection of cognitive psychology, neurobiology and educational practice.
“This program taught me about what could go right in learning and all the different ways that things can go wrong,” Kievlan said.
One of the main focuses of the program is to understand the ability of the human brain, which Kievlan says is important when working as a learning resource specialist.
“The brain is remarkable,” Kievlan said, smiling broadly. “The brain makes itself up as it goes along, and the fact that we learn to read at all, is insane because it is totally artificial since language is human constructed.”
Kievlan grabs a book from her desk, pointing to the word “his” on the cover and explains why most people can no longer perceive how they are able to read words.
“I can’t tell you if when I see the word ‘his’, I am sounding that word out, or if I am knowing that it is ‘his’ because I know that it is h-i-s, or if I just recognize that word because I have seen it tens of thousands of times,.” Kievlan said.
Kievlan utilizes this thought process in helping students figure out if they have a hard time recognizing words, remembering words or sounding out words.
“I went to graduate school to find out how people learn and I discovered that we don’t know a whole lot, but we have a lot of ideas.,” Kievlan said.
Kievlan thinks that disorders such as dyslexia, a developmental reading disorder, and attention issues do not have simple solutions because there are many ways people can learn and approach problems.
“I don’t like the term ‘learning disability’ because I think it’s inexact and stigmatizing,” Kievlan said. “I feel like it is more of a difference because everybody learns and absorbs information differently.”
Kievlan’s job at CSH is focused around helping students do better at whatever task they have trouble with in their academics.
“Every freshman went to Ms. Kievlan during midterm week,” freshman Shannon Lum said. “She really helps students get closer to the grade they want through improvement in organization and study strategies.”
Students can meet with Kievlan after scheduling an appointment with her during lunch, free periods or after school for tutoring, study tips or to review assignments that have been handed back.
Her students are not the only ones who recognize her dedication to education — her husband Daniel applauds her work with adolescents.
“Patricia’s great at her job because there are few things that she enjoys more than watching a student master a previously-difficult concept, gain a new insight or cultivate a new sense of confidence,” Daniel Kievlan said. “Maybe she enjoys drinking her green tea just as much, but it’s a close call.”
A learning resource specialist’s success is more nuanced according to Kievlan, yet these small accomplishments are what she says are the most rewarding.
“I want every student I work with to try to be saints and poets,” Kievlan said. “Be the people who notice the little victories and appreciate every minute of life.”

Isabelle Pinard
Reporter

A glance into the learning resource specialist’s office across from the freshman-sophomore locker room reveals a smiling face resting on propped elbows, greeting students who walk by with a “Hey, come on in!”

Patricia Kievlan, who began working at CSH in the fall, decided to pursue a career in education after graduating from the University of Texas.

“I originally thought that I wanted to earn a PhD in English.” Kievlan said. “Luckily, I realized that I was less interested in studying Virginia Woolf for the rest of my life and more interested in helping people. That’s why I chose to earn my master’s degree from the Mind, Brain, and Education program at the Harvard Graduate School of Education.”

The program studies the intersection of cognitive psychology, neurobiology and educational practice.

“This program taught me about what could go right in learning and all the different ways that things can go wrong,” Kievlan said.

One of the main focuses of the program is to understand the ability of the human brain, which Kievlan says is important when working as a learning resource specialist.

“The brain is remarkable,” Kievlan said, smiling broadly. “The brain makes itself up as it goes along, and the fact that we learn to read at all, is insane because it is totally artificial since language is human constructed.”

Kievlan grabs a book from her desk, pointing to the word “his” on the cover and explains why most people can no longer perceive how they are able to read words.

“I can’t tell you if when I see the word ‘his’, I am sounding that word out, or if I am knowing that it is ‘his’ because I know that it is h-i-s, or if I just recognize that word because I have seen it tens of thousands of times,.” Kievlan said.

Kievlan utilizes this thought process in helping students figure out if they have a hard time recognizing words, remembering words or sounding out words.

Katy Hallowell | the broadview.  Juniors Taylor Carlson and Solana Boboschi sit in Kievlan's office and discuss grades they recieved on an english paper. Kievlan tutors students in all subjects, and helps them to build effective study habits.

Katy Hallowell | the broadview. Juniors Taylor Carlson and Solana Boboschi sit in Kievlan's office and discuss grades they recieved on an english paper. Kievlan tutors students in all subjects, and helps them to build effective study habits.

“I went to graduate school to find out how people learn and I discovered that we don’t know a whole lot, but we have a lot of ideas.,” Kievlan said.

Kievlan thinks that disorders such as dyslexia, a developmental reading disorder, and attention issues do not have simple solutions because there are many ways people can learn and approach problems.

“I don’t like the term ‘learning disability’ because I think it’s inexact and stigmatizing,” Kievlan said. “I feel like it is more of a difference because everybody learns and absorbs information differently.”

Kievlan’s job at CSH is focused around helping students do better at whatever task they have trouble with in their academics.

“Every freshman went to Ms. Kievlan during midterm week,” freshman Shannon Lum said. “She really helps students get closer to the grade they want through improvement in organization and study strategies.”

Students can meet with Kievlan after scheduling an appointment with her during lunch, free periods or after school for tutoring, study tips or to review assignments that have been handed back.

Her students are not the only ones who recognize her dedication to education — her husband Daniel applauds her work with adolescents.

“Patricia’s great at her job because there are few things that she enjoys more than watching a student master a previously-difficult concept, gain a new insight or cultivate a new sense of confidence,” Daniel Kievlan said. “Maybe she enjoys drinking her green tea just as much, but it’s a close call.”

A learning resource specialist’s success is more nuanced according to Kievlan, yet these small accomplishments are what she says are the most rewarding.

“I want every student I work with to try to be saints and poets,” Kievlan said. “Be the people who notice the little victories and appreciate every minute of life.”

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