The student news site of Convent of the Sacred Heart High School

The Broadview

The student news site of Convent of the Sacred Heart High School

The Broadview

The student news site of Convent of the Sacred Heart High School

The Broadview

Ada Linde
Ada Linde
Editor-in-Chief
Heidi Yeung
Heidi Yeung
Copy Editor
Fiona Kenny
Fiona Kenny
Sports Editor
The Archives

A reflection on food reviews

I love food. In fact, I pitched a story about the Let’s be Frank hot dog cart near school on Thursdays when I was a sophomore, and I have been writing about the city’s culinary treasures and a few travesties ever since.
Writing about food for three years has really changed how I perceive my break- fast, lunch and dinner. Eating with texture and flavor adjectives in mind has transformed my meals into occasions of critique. I don’t expecting culinary mastery in the school cafeteria — which has to cater to the pallet of a 6 year old — or from my mother (sorry, Mom), but judging food has become second nature.
At first it was uncomfortable to whip out my phone and do a photo shoot with a burrito or a plate in a nice restaurant, making sure no bites were taken before I got the perfect shot. Food photography looks obnoxious to passersby, but to me it’s worth it to get a high-quality shot of a twist of cupcake frosting or capture the gooeyness of melting Gruyere. Often I’ve had to remind dining companions, “It’s not weird — I write reviews.”
One of the toughest parts of eating for a
review is distinguishing generic tastiness from the exceptional. Sometimes I know at first bite that this is something I’ve never tasted before. Making the distinctions, between the best bun-mee sandwich and an averagely delicious one comes with a lot of practice.
I like to consider myself a foodie; sampling around town when I see the opportunity to get a snack with friends. A few of my Instagram followers have told me they even peruse my pictures for dining ideas.
The City is filled with a plethora of artisanal food trucks, stands, carts and hole-in-the-wall restaurants that offer
locally-sourced and organic items for a high-quality price. Don’t get me wrong — there are a bunch of great places to eat for cheap and if you don’t care about where the produce came from or how long it took someone to make — you don’t have to. But if you’re like me, that extra care and quality make a long line or a high price worth it.
It’s not the cheapest interest to pursue, but because I like to investigate new local businesses from sit-down restaurants to juice stands, I feel like my money is go- ing back into one of the aspects of the City that makes San Francisco so special.

alice-mug-colorAlice Jones
Food Columnist

I love food. In fact, I pitched a story about the Let’s be Frank hot dog cart near school on Thursdays when I was a sophomore, and I have been writing about the city’s culinary treasures and a few travesties ever since.

Writing about food for three years has really changed how I perceive my breakfast, lunch and dinner. Eating with texture and flavor adjectives in mind has transformed my meals into occasions of critique. I don’t expecting culinary mastery in the school cafeteria — which has to cater to the pallet of a 6 year old — or from my mother (sorry, Mom), but judging food has become second nature.

At first it was uncomfortable to whip out my phone and do a photo shoot with a burrito or a plate in a nice restaurant, making sure no bites were taken before I got the perfect shot. Food photography looks obnoxious to passersby, but to me it’s worth it to get a high-quality shot of a twist of cupcake frosting or capture the gooeyness of melting Gruyere. Often I’ve had to remind dining companions, “It’s not weird — I write reviews.”

One of the toughest parts of eating for a review is distinguishing generic tastiness from the exceptional. Sometimes I know at first bite that this is something I’ve never tasted before. Making the distinctions, between the best bun-mee sandwich and an averagely delicious one comes with a lot of practice.

I like to consider myself a foodie; sampling around town when I see the opportunity to get a snack with friends. A few of my Instagram followers have told me they even peruse my pictures for dining ideas.

The City is filled with a plethora of artisanal food trucks, stands, carts and hole-in-the-wall restaurants that offer

locally-sourced and organic items for a high-quality price. Don’t get me wrong — there are a bunch of great places to eat for cheap and if you don’t care about where the produce came from or how long it took someone to make — you don’t have to. But if you’re like me, that extra care and quality make a long line or a high price worth it.

It’s not the cheapest interest to pursue, but because I like to investigate new local businesses from sit-down restaurants to juice stands, I feel like my money is going back into one of the aspects of the City that makes San Francisco so special.

Leave a Comment
More to Discover

Comments (0)

All The Broadview Picks Reader Picks Sort: Newest

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *