Students prepare for Noëls

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Students prepare for Noëls

Spanish III students Cristina Jackson and Olivia Williams practice their hand motions and Spanish song for Noels. Their class’s song is called “Tun Tun” and is about Christmas carolers knocking on doors around Christmas time. 

Spanish III students Cristina Jackson and Olivia Williams practice their hand motions and Spanish song for Noels. Their class’s song is called “Tun Tun” and is about Christmas carolers knocking on doors around Christmas time. 

Spanish III students Cristina Jackson and Olivia Williams practice their hand motions and Spanish song for Noels. Their class’s song is called “Tun Tun” and is about Christmas carolers knocking on doors around Christmas time. 

Spanish III students Cristina Jackson and Olivia Williams practice their hand motions and Spanish song for Noels. Their class’s song is called “Tun Tun” and is about Christmas carolers knocking on doors around Christmas time. 

Mackenna Moslander, Reporter

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In language classes throughout Convent, students are learning holiday songs in their respective languages in preparation for Noels. 

“Noels is an opportunity for the whole school to gather and celebrate the season,” Spanish teacher Antony Reyes said. “It gives us not only a space to celebrate but a space to celebrate through music.”

As Noels is an annual tradition that includes the entire school, it is a special and memorable tradition, according to sophomore Bridget Mills.

“Gathering in the gym to sing brings back a lot of memories from both middle school and elementary school,” Mills said. “It has been really fun to start as one of the youngest in the room listening to the older girls sing and get to grow up and sing those same songs.”

Right now, the high school French students are working on memorizing the words to the song, according to French III student Nina Gutierrez. 

“In class, we all stand up and face the back of the room to sing so we can’t see the words,” Gutierrez said. “However, since we’re still learning, if we need help with the lyrics we can turn around to check the next line.” 

In some Spanish classes, the students learn hand motions along with the lyrics, according to Mills. 

“We use hand motions to help remember the lyrics of the song,” Mills said. “It also ensures that our energy is high will we are singing and that we are comprehending the meaning of the lyrics.”

Having the Christmas songs in the languages taught in the Sacred Heart community is an essential aspect of the heritage of the school. 

“Singing in another language is just a different type of input where you can learn about the culture and the people,” Reyes said. “All of that can be achieved solely by singing in the target language.

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