Club hosts clothing swap

Sophomore+Anneli+Dolan+donates+a+shirt+to+the+Eco+Friends+clothing+swap.+%0AThrifting+and+purchasing+second-hand+helps+to+reduce+plastic+in+landfills+and+carbon+dioxide+emissions.%0A
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Club hosts clothing swap

Sophomore Anneli Dolan donates a shirt to the Eco Friends clothing swap. 
Thrifting and purchasing second-hand helps to reduce plastic in landfills and carbon dioxide emissions.

Sophomore Anneli Dolan donates a shirt to the Eco Friends clothing swap. Thrifting and purchasing second-hand helps to reduce plastic in landfills and carbon dioxide emissions.

Adele Fratesi

Sophomore Anneli Dolan donates a shirt to the Eco Friends clothing swap. Thrifting and purchasing second-hand helps to reduce plastic in landfills and carbon dioxide emissions.

Adele Fratesi

Adele Fratesi

Sophomore Anneli Dolan donates a shirt to the Eco Friends clothing swap. Thrifting and purchasing second-hand helps to reduce plastic in landfills and carbon dioxide emissions.

Adele Fratesi, Reporter

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WEB EXCLUSIVE Students participated in a clothing swap sponsored by the Eco Friends club where students donated used clothing in an effort to reduce waste and pollution. 

“The club decided to organize the clothing swap because thrifting is better for the environment,” junior Naia Urruty, Eco Friends club leader, said. “It saves many materials and is much cheaper.”

Students can drop clothing in a cardboard box in exchange for tickets which can be used to purchase and clothing in the “pop-up swap” on Nov. 6.

“I thought it was important to give clothes because it is a really easy way to help the planet,” junior Emily Ternynck said. “I go thrifting a lot by myself so this is normal for me.”

The donation boxes will continue to be around campus for the next week in case anyone forgot to bring in clothes today. All leftover donations will be donated to the Salvation Army after Nov. 6.

Americans dispose of 10.5 million tons of clothing every year. Over 60% of clothing produced worldwide is made from synthetic materials that are unable to break down causing thrown out clothing to sit in landfills for hundreds of years, according to the UC Berkeley Student Environmental Resource Center.

“As a member of the Environmental Systems and Societies class we are learning about the world and how the climate is rapidly changing,” Naia Urruty said. “I created this club with junior Maddie Lerseth to help bring awareness to these issues and save our planet.”

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