Sororities provide young women a smaller community within large colleges and universities.


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Among a frenzy of decorated houses and posters plastered with Greek lettering, collegiate women who decide to participate in sorority recruitment, also informally known as “rush,” socialize with active members to find a sisterhood within a larger community.
Recruitment consists of meet-and-greets, open house tours, a philanthropy round showcasing the sorority’s supported charities and a preference round where favored potential new members, also known as PNM’s, are invited back to the house before choosing a pledge class, according to Recruitment 101.
“For many 18 year olds, the transition from high school to college can be challenging,” Barb Boersma, former Panhellenic Board Member for the Delta Gamma sorority said. “By rushing, girls can find where they belong as well as receive future opportunities for leadership, academic scholarships, social networking and service.”
Sororities provide a niche and focus for girls attending larger colleges, while they are an opportunity to grow for students on a small campus where choices might be limited, according to Boersma.
“I wanted to rush because I was looking for a positive and supportive environment in college like Convent had provided for me,” Caroline Coulter (’14) said. “I wanted to continue being around women who inspired me, while also finding ways to make my college feel smaller.”
Joining a sorority is a lot like being on a sports team with the support that sorority sister give one another, according to Isabella Borges (’13).
“I recommend joining a sorority, especially at a campus as large as UCLA,” Claire Fahy (’13) Vice President of Delta Delta Delta at the University of California at Los Angeles said. “My college experience wouldn’t be as well-rounded or enriching as it is if I hadn’t made the decision to join Greek Life.”
When rushing, it is important to be oneself, stick through the entire process and trust the system the sororities have for picking initiates, according to Boserma.
“Freshmen who want to rush should go into it open minded,” Hannae Nakajima (’14) said. “Before recruitment I knew some things about the houses which made me biased to them, but if I went through it again, I wouldn’t pretend to be someone I wasn’t to fit their mold.”
PNMs learn participating in a sorority does not only mean attending social events, but being surrounded by women who represent similar ideals and encourage self-confidence, according to Fahy.
“Rushing a sorority at Wisconsin next year will provide me with new experiences to not only expand my social circle, but find a sisterhood similar to Convent,” senior Sabine Dahi said. “I don’t think it would hurt to go through recruitment because you never know if you’ll end up finding the sorority you were meant to be in.”
Headlines such as “University of Michigan Fraternities and Sororities raise $35k for Autism” and “Sigma Chi breaks records, raising $76,300 for Make-A-Wish” also factor into a PNM’s decision when rushing, according to Boersma.
“Sororities compete for attention when potential new members ask themselves ‘What’s in it for me?’” Boersma said. “The sororities have to deliver a well-rounded, developmental, resume-building experience.”
PNM’s should also keep in mind that recruitment is not what it is portrayed to be in the movies and media, according to Fahy.
“Not many people understand that going through recruitment and joining a sorority has actually made me a better person,” Fahy said. “My experience in Tri Delta has made me a more competent leader, a more involved member of the UCLA community  and a more dedicated student.”

Sarah Selzer
Sports Editor

Among a frenzy of decorated houses and posters plastered with Greek lettering, collegiate women who decide to participate in sorority recruitment, also informally known as “rush,” socialize with active members to find a sisterhood within a larger community.

Recruitment consists of meet-and-greets, open house tours, a philanthropy round showcasing the sorority’s supported charities and a preference round where favored potential new members, also known as PNM’s, are invited back to the house before choosing a pledge class, according to Recruitment 101.

“For many 18 year olds, the transition from high school to college can be challenging,” Barb Boersma, former Panhellenic Board Member for the Delta Gamma sorority said. “By rushing, girls can find where they belong as well as receive future opportunities for leadership, academic scholarships, social networking and service.”

Sororities provide a niche and focus for girls attending larger colleges, while they are an opportunity to grow for students on a small campus where choices might be limited, according to Boersma.

 Bid day takes place on the National Mall (above) as Chi Omega sorority members welcome their new pledges into the sisterhood at the George Washington University.  The pledging process, or “rushing” requires potential sisters to talk with members of each sorority. Initiates receive gear which advertises their particular sorority. Young women who join  sororities, are members for life.

Bid day takes place on the National Mall (above) as Chi Omega sorority members welcome their new pledges into the sisterhood at the George Washington University. The pledging process, or “rushing” requires potential sisters to talk with members of each sorority. Initiates receive gear which advertises their particular sorority. Young women who join sororities, are members for life.

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“I wanted to rush because I was looking for a positive and supportive environment in college like Convent had provided for me,” Caroline Coulter (’14) said. “I wanted to continue being around women who inspired me, while also finding ways to make my college feel smaller.”

Joining a sorority is a lot like being on a sports team with the support that sorority sister give one another, according to Isabella Borges (’13).

“I recommend joining a sorority, especially at a campus as large as UCLA,” Claire Fahy (’13) Vice President of Delta Delta Delta at the University of California at Los Angeles said. “My college experience wouldn’t be as well-rounded or enriching as it is if I hadn’t made the decision to join Greek Life.”

When rushing, it is important to be oneself, stick through the entire process and trust the system the sororities have for picking initiates, according to Boserma.

“Freshmen who want to rush should go into it open minded,” Hannae Nakajima (’14) said. “Before recruitment I knew some things about the houses which made me biased to them, but if I went through it again, I wouldn’t pretend to be someone I wasn’t to fit their mold.”

PNMs learn participating in a sorority does not only mean attending social events, but being surrounded by women who represent similar ideals and encourage self-confidence, according to Fahy.

“Rushing a sorority at Wisconsin next year will provide me with new experiences to not only expand my social circle, but find a sisterhood similar to Convent,” senior Sabine Dahi said. “I don’t think it would hurt to go through recruitment because you never know if you’ll end up finding the sorority you were meant to be in.”

Headlines such as “University of Michigan Fraternities and Sororities raise $35k for Autism” and “Sigma Chi breaks records, raising $76,300 for Make-A-Wish” also factor into a PNM’s decision when rushing, according to Boersma.

“Sororities compete for attention when potential new members ask themselves ‘What’s in it for me?’” Boersma said. “The sororities have to deliver a well-rounded, developmental, resume-building experience.”

PNM’s should also keep in mind that recruitment is not what it is portrayed to be in the movies and media, according to Fahy.

“Not many people understand that going through recruitment and joining a sorority has actually made me a better person,” Fahy said. “My experience in Tri Delta has made me a more competent leader, a more involved member of the UCLA community  and a more dedicated student.”

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