‘At the Table’ performance highlights civil rights movement

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Sarah Selzer
Sports Editor

Ayinde Russell, At the Table with Dr. King performer explains how Martin Luther King was inspired to give his "I Had a Dream" speech in 1963.

As the Herbert Center Gym filled with seventh to 12th grade students, teachers and administrators, the multi-media assembly program At the Table with Dr. King tuned pianos and set up props in preparation for the Freedom Power assembly earlier this afternoon.=
While embodying the sights and sounds of the American Civil Rights Movement, At The Table With Dr. King used elements such as spoken word, acting, song and instrument to depict the story of how Martin Luther King was able to rise above racism, according to Ayinde Russell, At the Table with Dr. King performer.
“I believe that we as a society can be sometimes blind or invisible to the real issues going on around in our nations history,” Ayinde Russell, At the Table with Dr. King performer said. “Young people can create so much change if they realize that they have the power to do so. The future of this country is in your hands, and how your generation acts upon modern racism determines the views that the next generation has on racial discrimination.”
The performance includes 11 parts that target what prompted King to lead the battle in fighting for equal rights.
“Reliving Martin Luther King’s death in a way that we can celebrate his legacy is still truly so powerful.” Rachel Simpson, Head of Convent High School said. “And for this program to come in and really revive the feelings of the 1960’s truly invites us to join in against the great struggle of racism as a community.”
At the Table with Dr. King has not only performed all over the nation but also performed for nine schools in India in 2014, according to Russell.
“It’s really amazing that they are able to reach out to so many people with their performance,” junior Mae Singer said. “I think more schools around the Bay Area should be able to hear what they have to say about the lessons learned from the Civil Rights Movement because it applies to struggles like the situation in Ferguson today.”
The assembly is meant to instill a desire for young students to want to change the way they see unfair treatment of race and what they can do to help with their performance, according to Russell.
“This presentation was really about keeping the message of Martin Luther King alive,” Simpson said. “In what we consider ‘post- racial America’, we need to remember that the good fight is still on and worth advocating for in terms of justice and peace for all.”

As the Herbert Center Gym filled with seventh to 12th grade students, teachers and administrators, the multi-media assembly program At the Table with Dr. King tuned pianos and set up props in preparation for the Freedom Power assembly.

While embodying the sights and sounds of the American Civil Rights Movement, At The Table With Dr. King used elements such as spoken word, acting, song and instrument to depict the story of how Martin Luther King was able to rise above racism, according to Ayinde Russell, At the Table with Dr. King performer.

“I believe that we as a society can be sometimes blind or invisible to the real issues going on around in our nations history,” Russell said. “Young people can create so much change if they realize that they have the power to do so. The future of this country is in your hands, and how your generation acts upon modern racism determines the views that the next generation has on racial discrimination.”

The performance includes 11 parts that target what prompted King to lead the battle in fighting for equal rights.

“Reliving Martin Luther King’s death in a way that we can celebrate his legacy is truly so powerful.” Rachel Simpson, Head of Convent High School said. “And for this program to come in and really revive the feelings of the 1960’s truly invites us to join in against the great struggle of racism as a community.”

At the Table with Dr. King has not only performed all over the nation but also performed for nine schools in India in 2014, according to Russell.

“It’s really amazing that they are able to reach out to so many people with their performance,” junior Mae Singer said. “I think more schools around the Bay Area should be able to hear what they have to say about the lessons learned from the Civil Rights Movement because it applies to struggles like the situation in Ferguson today.”

The assembly is meant to instill a desire for young students to want to change the way they see unfair treatment of race and what they can do to help with their performance, according to Russell.

“This presentation was really about keeping the message of Martin Luther King alive,” Simpson said. “In what we consider ‘post- racial America’, we need to remember that the good fight is still on and worth advocating for in terms of justice and peace for all.”

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