Grads find comfort in Greek life: CSH graduates find comfort in small, all-female communities


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While most CSH graduates matriculate to coed universities, many still seek the familiarity of a small, all-female community. Greek organizations can offer that intimate environment within a larger setting — a good compromise for students searching for both.
Sororities and fraternities are social organizations for female and male undergraduates. These organizations are named with Greek letters and sponsor activities that are commonly referred to under the umbrella of “Greek life.”
“Coming from Convent I was used to the close, all-female community, and I loved it,” Annie De Lancie (’12) said. “I always assumed that wherever I went to college I would be involved in a sorority.”
De Lancie went through Recruitment at the University of Oregon this past fall. She chose Chi Omega, the same sorority her sister, Sophie De Lancie (’11) joined at Pennsylvania’s Villanova University.
“I was a legacy for Chi Omega, meaning someone in my family is a part of the same sorority,” De Lancie said. “During rush they paid a little extra attention to me, but mostly I was just myself and it worked perfectly.”
Students, especially those at larger schools, may look for a similar environment to the one they came from. Kristen Kennedy (’12), who recently finished her freshman year at Colorado University at Boulder is a member of Kappa Alpha Theta, and like De Lancie, her older sister is also a member of the same sorority.
“Coming from Convent, it was easy to rush because I loved the girls and they reminded me of my friends back at home,” Kennedy said. “I have met great people, but being part of a sorority is a time commitment. If you don’t make the most of it, it could definitely be a drag.”
In some cases, the social commitments sororities demand of its members distract from academics, but some sororities have programs to support academic success. At most universities, potential new members must meet a grade point average minimum in order to undergo formal Recruitment. Some sororities keep their GPA minimum high so members are motivated to succeed.
“At my sorority, the minimum GPA is a lot higher than that of my university,” Emily Bloch (’12) a member of Delta Gamma at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, said. “It keeps me doing my work, because I love participating in Greek life.”
Bloch went through formal Recruitment this past fall. Her sorority has monitored study hour requirements for members who fall beneath the GPA minimum, according to Bloch.
Sororities offer a wide avenue for freshmen to meet other students, but those who choose not to be involved in Greek organizations have more time to focus on other parts of the college experience, according to college counselor Rebecca Munda.
“Students who are not involved usually spend more time on their academics and explore other activities,” Munda said.
In schools where the Greek life has a large presence, it can become difficult to get involved in other groups outside the Greek umbrella.
“The girls I know who are involved in Greek life don’t do much else besides sorority activities,” Meghan Helms (’12) said. “There is so much more you can do and be a part of when you’re not ‘Greek.’”
Helms is finishing her freshman year at the University of Washington at Seattle, and spends her weekends sailing with the campus’ yacht club, studying and occasionally participating in Greek events.
“I don’t feel like I’m missing out on socializing at all, not being in a sorority,” Helms said. “I have had the freedom to find some awesome people, and get involved with other clubs and groups on campus. At the same time, most Greek events are not exclusive, so my friends and I have the opportunity to participate in Greek activities as well.”
Helms said she avoided joining a sorority due to a demanding rush schedule. Formal Recruitment at UW is held two weeks before classes start, according to the University of Washington Panhellenic Society, a schedule similar to many other universities. Some colleges hold formal Recruitment during school, so interested students have to skip classes.
“Even though I chose not to be involved, I can see how coming from Convent — a tight-knit community like that of a sorority — could be great,” Helms said. “Despite the various drawbacks, being a part of that similar environment could be a wonderful addition to a college experience.”

Rebecca Siegel
Design Editor

While most CSH graduates matriculate to coed universities, many still seek the familiarity of a small, all-female community. Greek organizations can offer that intimate environment within a larger setting — a good compromise for students searching for both.

Sororities and fraternities are social organizations for female and male undergraduates. These organizations are named with Greek letters and sponsor activities that are commonly referred to under the umbrella of “Greek life.”

“Coming from Convent I was used to the close, all-female community, and I loved it,” Annie De Lancie (’12) said. “I always assumed that wherever I went to college I would be involved in a sorority.”

De Lancie went through Recruitment at the University of Oregon this past fall. She chose Chi Omega, the same sorority her sister, Sophie De Lancie (’11) joined at Pennsylvania’s Villanova University.

“I was a legacy for Chi Omega, meaning someone in my family is a part of the same sorority,” De Lancie said. “During rush they paid a little extra attention to me, but mostly I was just myself and it worked perfectly.”

Students, especially those at larger schools, may look for a similar environment to the one they came from. Kristen Kennedy (’12), who recently finished her freshman year at Colorado University at Boulder is a member of Kappa Alpha Theta, and like De Lancie, her older sister is also a member of the same sorority.

“Coming from Convent, it was easy to rush because I loved the girls and they reminded me of my friends back at home,” Kennedy said. “I have met great people, but being part of a sorority is a time commitment. If you don’t make the most of it, it could definitely be a drag.”

In some cases, the social commitments sororities demand of its members distract from academics, but some sororities have programs to support academic success. At most universities, potential new members must meet a grade point average minimum in order to undergo formal Recruitment. Some sororities keep their GPA minimum high so members are motivated to succeed.

“At my sorority, the minimum GPA is a lot higher than that of my university,” Emily Bloch (’12) a member of Delta Gamma at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, said. “It keeps me doing my work, because I love participating in Greek life.”

Bloch went through formal Recruitment this past fall. Her sorority has monitored study hour requirements for members who fall beneath the GPA minimum, according to Bloch.

Sororities offer a wide avenue for freshmen to meet other students, but those who choose not to be involved in Greek organizations have more time to focus on other parts of the college experience, according to college counselor Rebecca Munda.

“Students who are not involved usually spend more time on their academics and explore other activities,” Munda said.

In schools where the Greek life has a large presence, it can become difficult to get involved in other groups outside the Greek umbrella.

“The girls I know who are involved in Greek life don’t do much else besides sorority activities,” Meghan Helms (’12) said. “There is so much more you can do and be a part of when you’re not ‘Greek.’”

Helms is finishing her freshman year at the University of Washington at Seattle, and spends her weekends sailing with the campus’ yacht club, studying and occasionally participating in Greek events.

“I don’t feel like I’m missing out on socializing at all, not being in a sorority,” Helms said. “I have had the freedom to find some awesome people, and get involved with other clubs and groups on campus. At the same time, most Greek events are not exclusive, so my friends and I have the opportunity to participate in Greek activities as well.”

Helms said she avoided joining a sorority due to a demanding rush schedule. Formal Recruitment at UW is held two weeks before classes start, according to the University of Washington Panhellenic Society, a schedule similar to many other universities. Some colleges hold formal Recruitment during school, so interested students have to skip classes.

“Even though I chose not to be involved, I can see how coming from Convent — a tight-knit community like that of a sorority — could be great,” Helms said. “Despite the various drawbacks, being a part of that similar environment could be a wonderful addition to a college experience.”

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