Vintage stores are in

Ashley Weber sells a vintage sweater at The Junior League of San Francisco’s Next-to-New Shop & Consignment Boutique. Next-to-New re-sells used clothing and donates portions of the proceeds to community programs. KATIE GHOTBI | the broadview
Ashley Weber sells a vintage sweater at The Junior League of San Francisco’s Next-to-New Shop & Consignment Boutique. Next-to-New re-sells used clothing and donates portions of the proceeds to community programs. KATIE GHOTBI | the broadview

Emma Herlihy
Asst.  News Editor

Second-hand stores can provide affordable clothing, holiday gifts and the opportunity to sell used clothes, which is especially valuable in the state of the economy.

“We hand-select our items, so instead of going to a store trying to find something nice – like digging through a thrift store – you can come here and all of the items are good,” said employee Tatiana Kartomten of the second-hand store Wasteland on Haight.

Many second-hand stores buy clothes from the general public, only accepting clothing that are high-end vintage, designer and contemporary, while thrift stores usually accept donated clothes of varying qualities.

“Stores that choose the clothes they accept usually have the best things because they know what people would buy and they are easier to look through,” said sophomore Chloe Polite, who occasionally shops at thrift stores. “The best thing I have found was a nice dress for $15.”

Prices usually run from $10 to $150, depending on the quality of the clothing and the designer. Clients who sell used clothing receive a portion of the selling price. At Wasteland, sellers receive 35 percent.

“Lately the prices I have seen second-hand stores are actually expensive considering that part of the point of the store is to buy things at a discounted price,” said sophomore Lily Kaplan. “I have noticed that jeans are especially expensive lately. The designer jeans are only being marked down $10 or $20 from the original price, so they are staying in the hundreds.”

Clothing at Retro Fit Vintage is either delicately dry cleaned or hand washed before being put on sale.

“The quality of the garments and the care set our store apart from others,” said Steven Lemay of Retro Fit Vintage. “The garments are in good quality and no repairs need to be done and they are all clean.”

Clothing in each store reflects the style of its neighborhood, because he people living in the area tend to be the main contributors to the store.

“I found a lace sweater from Chris Consignment that felt like it was one-of-a-kind,” said Kaplan. “It was my favorite sweater for awhile and I got so many uses out of it.