Holocaust survivor speaks to student body

Holocaust Survivor Paul Schwarzbart speaks to students about surviving the Holocaust as a young jewish boy hiding in a Catholic school. Shwarzbart later found out that there were over 80 other Jewish boys hiding at the school while he was there.

Holocaust Survivor Paul Schwarzbart speaks to students about surviving the Holocaust as a young jewish boy hiding in a Catholic school. Shwarzbart later found out that there were over 80 other Jewish boys hiding at the school while he was there.

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Zoe Newcomb
Editor-in-Chief

Holocaust survivor Paul Shwarzbart spoke to CSH and SHHS students this morning in Syufy Theatre about his experiences hiding as a Jewish boy in a Belgium Catholic school during the war.

“That’s what a real Christian can do — they saved 83 boys out of 124,” Shwarzbart said, of the number of Jewish boys hidden at the Catholic school.

Shwarzbart snuck into Belgium from Austria as a young boy, where he lived until his father was arrested and sent to a death camp. At 8-years-old, Swarzbart’s mother sent him with a group of strangers — whom he later discovered to members of the Jewish Underground Railroad — who helped him hide as under the guise of a Catholic schoolboy until the end of war when he was reunited with his mother.

Holocaust Survivor Paul Schwarzbart speaks to students about surviving the Holocaust as a young jewish boy hiding in a Catholic school. Shwarzbart later found out that there were over 80 other Jewish boys hiding at the school while he was there.

Holocaust Survivor Paul Schwarzbart speaks to students about surviving the Holocaust as a young jewish boy hiding in a Catholic school. Shwarzbart later found out that there were over 80 other Jewish boys hiding at the school while he was there.

“He was able to connect history and his real life experiences together in both a humorous and poignant way,” senior Kristy Harty-Connell said. “By the end of his speech I was both laughing and crying.”

Shwarzbart moved to San Francisco as a teenager where we finished his education at George Washington High School and University of California, Berkeley. He worked as a professor for 45 years, following in the footsteps of the teachers who played key roles in helping him to survive the holocaust.

“I”m a optimistic person and everyone thought that everything would return back to normal after the war,” Shwarzbart said. “I lost 66 members of my family including my father.”

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
(Visited 226 times, 1 visits today)

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story