Frightful Friday

Students, faculty celebrate Halloween in costume

Juniors Maya Lewis, Kiki Dauphin and Isabella Rovetti gather materials in their IB Visual Arts class on Friday while dressed up in their Halloween costumes. Students were not allowed to wear violent or offensive costumes or any sort of facial obstruction or mask that was not a COVID-19 facial covering.

Nicole Klein

Juniors Maya Lewis, Kiki Dauphin and Isabella Rovetti gather materials in their IB Visual Arts class on Friday while dressed up in their Halloween costumes. Students were not allowed to wear violent or offensive costumes or any sort of facial obstruction or mask that was not a COVID-19 facial covering.

Nicole Klein, Senior Reporter

WEB EXCLUSIVE | School community members were found roaming the halls this past Friday in various costumes to celebrate Halloween in person for the first time in two years. 

“It’s always fun to dress up and it’s a spirit day so it’s nice to see everyone participating in it after so long,” junior Anya Riney-Niewiadomski. said. “I’m also going to Outside Lands on Saturday which I think will be a new tradition for a lot of us on Halloween.” 

As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, the Outside Lands music festival, which is usually held in August, is now being held on Halloween weekend. 

“We’re going to create a photo album slideshow of students in their costumes,” Community Life Chair Michael Buckley said. “Typically there’s an in-person costume contest, but sadly due to COVID, we’re unable to continue that tradition.” 

Administration required costumes to be kid-friendly and not offensive or violent. Students were also not permitted to wear masks or obscure their face with any object that was not a COVID-19 facial covering, according to the Thursday notes.  

“I live in Pacific Heights and my block often hands out candy and decorates their homes with spider webs and lights,” junior Sophia Wu said. “This year we’re going to decorate the trunk of our car, and call it a Trunk-O-Treat” 

Supply shortages as a result of the pandemic have affected delivery time for costumes by Oct. 31. A group of cargo ships that contributes to 40% of imports is facing delays, according to the United States Census Bureau. 

“I’m going to be a dark angel in a group costume with my friends,” junior Anya Riney said. “It was one of the only costumes I could find but I’m really looking forward to finally celebrating Halloween with my friends back in-person.” 

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