Students and faculty adapt to hybrid learning

Community accommodates students learning from home and in-person

Juniors+Sara+Ramelot+Alina+Kushner+work+socially+distanced+in+Gender+Power+%26+Ethics+while+the+Meeting+Owl+connects+students+in+the+classroom+to+those+who+are+attending+online+via+Zoom.+A+360+degree+camera+on+the+Meeting+Owl+allowed+students+at+home+to+better+engage+with+in-person+classmates.

Juniors Sara Ramelot Alina Kushner work socially distanced in Gender Power & Ethics while the Meeting Owl connects students in the classroom to those who are attending online via Zoom. A 360 degree camera on the Meeting Owl allowed students at home to better engage with in-person classmates.

Nina Gutierrez, Senior Reporter

WEB EXCLUSIVE While some students sit in classrooms and others remain on Zoom from home, teachers are navigating hybrid learning through Meeting Owls that provide a 360 degree view of the classroom and pin the camera on whomever is speaking. 

“It’s really nice that the school is trying to use technology to make hybrid learning smoother,” junior Mira Chawla who is continuing to remote into classes said. “It makes online students feel like we are still part of the class.”

Hybrid allows students to find the right space for their health and their well being, whether that be in-person or at home, according to History & Social Sciences teacher Michael Buckley.

“It has been very nice to be back at school,” junior Olivia Williams said. “For me, it is definitely easier to learn in-person and the campus feels very safe.”

The Meeting Owl allows students attending class via Zoom to see everyone in the classroom and automatically directs where the camera is pointing. 

“I have used the Owl in art class and it worked fairly well for those staying at home,” Williams said. “I could definitely see how the Owl could have benefits for a large group of students taking class online. 

Individuals are on a wide spectrum in terms of how safe they feel during the pandemic, according to Buckley. The school is making sure that those who choose not to physically attend classes are still able to participate in class. 

“The hybrid system has gone pretty well for me so far,” Chawla said. “It is definitely helpful to see my classmates and teachers because it feels a lot more engaging than it would be otherwise.”

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