‘Armonìa A capella’ club encourages the raw voice in its first meeting

The student-run group commenced their first meeting with new people and new opinions.

Freshman+Caroline+Phillipps+introduces+herself+and+her+accomplishments+as+a+singer+during+student+club+Armon%C3%ACa+A+capella%27s+introductory+meeting+in+the+chapel.+%2FLP
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‘Armonìa A capella’ club encourages the raw voice in its first meeting

Freshman Caroline Phillipps introduces herself and her accomplishments as a singer during student club Armonìa A capella's introductory meeting in the chapel. /LP

Freshman Caroline Phillipps introduces herself and her accomplishments as a singer during student club Armonìa A capella's introductory meeting in the chapel. /LP

Freshman Caroline Phillipps introduces herself and her accomplishments as a singer during student club Armonìa A capella's introductory meeting in the chapel. /LP

Freshman Caroline Phillipps introduces herself and her accomplishments as a singer during student club Armonìa A capella's introductory meeting in the chapel. /LP

Lisabelle Panossian, Web Editor

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Members of the student club Armonìa A capella gathered in the chapel today for their first meeting in the club’s second year, introducing themselves as well as their ideas.  

As part of a club without teacher supervision, students truly express themselves and share more of their ideas, according to club head Maya Greenhill.

Greenhill and former co-head Serafina Cinti say they started the club because they believed the school lacked an established music program.

“There’s a lot of talent in this school that’s just undiscovered and underused,” Cinti said. “I thought that this was a good outlet for really utilizing women’s voices.”

Greenhill already picked songs to introduce to the club for the year but declined to share names to surprise the audience during their performances.

“We got some classic favorites for Christmas as well as some songs for fall,” Greenhill said. “We’re going to add an a capella twist.”

The term “Armonìa” is Italian for harmony, a vocal technique especially used in a capella groups to sing different chord progression simultaneously.

“Music is a really important outlet for people,” Greenhill said. “Just having a place to sing and come together for the same purpose, to make music, is something very special.”

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