Appreciating the process

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For our Theology 4 midterm, the Senior Class watched Emilio Estevez’s “The Way,” which he wrote and stars in alongside his father Martin Sheen. Sheen plays a detached and disillusioned father whose son (Estevez) dies while making a pilgrimage on the famed Camino, a route stretching from France to Spain.
“You don’t choose a life, you live one,” Daniel, played by Estevez, tells his father Tom before he departs for his doomed adventure. After his son’s death, Tom completes the Camino in memory of his son, scattering his ashes along the way discovers the true purpose of his journey, which is to rediscover who he really is.
It might be considered a stretch, but as seniors, the college process is our Camino. We all start out with one goal in mind — getting in — but end up with a greater sense of who we are and what we want.
At first, as we excitedly and anxiously scrolled through schools on the Naviance website, seeing how we matched up on graphs and charts and adding schools to our lists, we imagined only how we would make our dreams reality.
Then, when it came down to actually filling out applications, we were faced with questions like “What makes you happy?” and “What do you believe and why?” What started out as simply a means to an end became a journey of self-discovery.
I hope regardless of the outcome, we can come to appreciate the process that defined the latter half of our high school careers. That as we sit amid acceptance
and rejection letters, we can look back and be glad that we were made to spell out who we were. In the face of those potential rejection letters, I hope we can stand up for that person we defined in our applications and realize that just because we didn’t get in, it does not mean we are not good enough.
As we embark on this final stretch, these stress-filled weeks leading up to the final admissions announcements, I hope that we can all remember Daniel’s words.
“You don’t choose a life, you live
one.”
Wherever we get in, wherever we go, we are living our lives. By choosing a college we aren’t choosing a life. Our lives are up to us.

Claire Fahy
Editor-in-Chief

For our Theology 4 midterm, the Senior Class watched Emilio Estevez’s “The Way,” which he wrote and stars in alongside his father Martin Sheen. Sheen plays a detached and disillusioned father whose son (Estevez) dies while making a pilgrimage on the famed Camino, a route stretching from France to Spain.

“You don’t choose a life, you live one,” Daniel, played by Estevez, tells his father Tom before he departs for his doomed adventure. After his son’s death, Tom completes the Camino in memory of his son, scattering his ashes along the way discovers the true purpose of his journey, which is to rediscover who he really is.

It might be considered a stretch, but as seniors, the college process is our Camino. We all start out with one goal in mind — getting in — but end up with a greater sense of who we are and what we want.

At first, as we excitedly and anxiously scrolled through schools on the Naviance website, seeing how we matched up on graphs and charts and adding schools to our lists, we imagined only how we would make our dreams reality.

Then, when it came down to actually filling out applications, we were faced with questions like “What makes you happy?” and “What do you believe and why?” What started out as simply a means to an end became a journey of self-discovery.

I hope regardless of the outcome, we can come to appreciate the process that defined the latter half of our high school careers. That as we sit amid acceptance

and rejection letters, we can look back and be glad that we were made to spell out who we were. In the face of those potential rejection letters, I hope we can stand up for that person we defined in our applications and realize that just because we didn’t get in, it does not mean we are not good enough.

As we embark on this final stretch, these stress-filled weeks leading up to the final admissions announcements, I hope that we can all remember Daniel’s words.“You don’t choose a life, you live one.” Wherever we get in, wherever we go, we are living our lives. By choosing a college we aren’t choosing a life. Our lives are up to us.

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