Club offers extra credit through math quizzes

Sophomore+Camilla+Sigmund+begins+a+California+Math+League+quiz+for+Math+Club%E2%80%99s+extra+credit+competition.+Students+had+30+minutes+to+complete+six+challenging+questions.
Back to Article
Back to Article

Club offers extra credit through math quizzes

Sophomore Camilla Sigmund begins a California Math League quiz for Math Club’s extra credit competition. Students had 30 minutes to complete six challenging questions.

Sophomore Camilla Sigmund begins a California Math League quiz for Math Club’s extra credit competition. Students had 30 minutes to complete six challenging questions.

Mason Cooney

Sophomore Camilla Sigmund begins a California Math League quiz for Math Club’s extra credit competition. Students had 30 minutes to complete six challenging questions.

Mason Cooney

Mason Cooney

Sophomore Camilla Sigmund begins a California Math League quiz for Math Club’s extra credit competition. Students had 30 minutes to complete six challenging questions.

Mason Cooney, Reporter

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Math Club held an in-house California Math League competition today during ColLab as an opportunity for students to earn extra credit in their math classes.

Students had 30 minutes to complete six questions in The California Math League’s monthly quizzes. Although the quizzes can be entered into the official Math League competition, Math Club only uses them for extra credit within the school.

“They’re fun to do,” math teacher Jordan Lewis said.

Former math teacher Armando De Anda introduced the practice, offering extra credit for the quizzes when he taught about five years ago, but the practice “fell by the wayside” once he left, according to Lewis.

Current club heads Cameron Newman and Sammy Beyene decided to continue the competition this year with the goal of making extra credit available to students again.

“It is a good opportunity to get the few extra points on a quiz, and it’s good practice,” Newman said.

The questions from the last competition proved challenging with the average score being one out of six, and the highest score being three out of six, according to Lewis.

“They’re difficult questions,” Lewis said. “The questions are not questions that you would typically see in a math book — more like outside-the-box thinking. It’s kind of fun to see which girls excel at that.”

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
(Visited 173 times, 1 visits today)

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story